Tag Archives: Health

Jane Says: What You Should Know About Lead in Green Tea

Fears over lead in green tea have more to do with the leaves than the drink itself.

Is green tea good for you?

Have you ever wondered if green tea is good for you? (Photo: wulingyun/Getty Images)

June 12, 2013 By 

Jane Lear was on staff at ‘Gourmet’ for almost 20 years.

full bio 

“I always thought green tea was good for you, but recently I’ve heard reports that it can contain the additive soy lecithin (why??) or be contaminated with lead. Should I stop drinking it?”

—Rory Anawalt

After water, tea is the most consumed drink on the planet. All of it—black, green, and in-between—comes from the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis. Yep, you read that correctly—the tea we drink is the leaf of a camellia. The two major varieties used for tea are C. sinensisvar. sinensis (Chinese tea), which is probably native to western Yunnan, and C. sinensis var.assamica (Assam tea, Indian tea), native to the warmer parts of Assam (India), Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southern China.

We’ll never know if an Indian tribesman or a Chinese healer brewed the primal cup of tea, writes Beatrice Hohenegger in Liquid Jade: The Story of Tea from East to West, but it was first cultivated in China during the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.E–220 C.E.). As a beverage, tea was celebrated by Taoists as an elixir of immortality, developed as a spiritual practice in Buddhist Japan, and became the catalyst of intrigue, industry, empire, and war. It does not require an assist from soy lecithin.

Unless, of course, you need the emulsifier/stabilizer to keep the “natural flavorings” in certain teas smoothly blended together so that they disperse into brewing tea. If you avoid soy—or just want unadulterated tea—it pays to read the ingredients list on the label. That’s especially true if you enjoy teas flavored with fruits, herbs, or spices, even from a “100% natural” brand such as Celestial Seasonings. At least that company’s lecithin comes from non-GMO soy.

The difference between green and black tea, by the way, is based on the degree of oxidation the leaves receive. Green tea comes from leaves that are steamed, pan-fired, or oven-fired immediately after picking, so minimal oxidation occurs. (White tea, made from new-growth buds and young leaves, is even less processed.) In a black tea—or red tea, as it’s called in China—the leaves are well and truly oxidized. The type of tea called oolong occupies the middle range; its partial oxidation results in varying, distinctive flavors and complex aromas.

All teas are rich in antioxidants, but green tea, especially when brewed from loose leaves, is known for its great abundance of the polyphenols classified as catechins—in particular, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). A great deal has been written about the health benefits of green tea, so I’ll spare you here; for an in-depth review, check out this research from theUniversity of Granada, in Spain.

Okay, about this lead business. ConsumerLab.com, an independent site that tests health and nutrition products, reported on May 21 that not only did catechin and caffeine levels vary widely in the green teas it tested (from Bigelow, Celestial Seasonings, Lipton, Salada, and Teavana), but that some contain lead in their leaves. “Lead is known to be taken up into tea leaves from the environment and can occur in high amounts in tea plants grown near industrial areas and active roadways, such as in certain areas in China …. the liquid portions of the brewed teas [italics mine] did not contain measurable amounts of lead (i.e., no more than 1.25 mcg per serving).” A microgram is equal to one millionth of a gram. As long as you don’t eat the tea leaves, you have nothing to worry about, in other words.

That said, limiting our exposure to lead is a smart thing to do (for excellent in-depth reporting on the subject, read USA Today’s recent coverage), but it’s important to understand that the chemical element occurs naturally everywhere, even in uncontaminated soils. Fortunately, a healthy diet rich in vitamin C, calcium, and iron can help mitigate lead’s harmful effects.

Lead contamination of C. sinensis has been studied at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, in Hangzhou, for years. In one article, published in the January 2006 issue of the journal Environmental Pollution, Chinese researchers analyze the lead concentrations in 1225 tea samples collected nationally between 1999 and 2001; among their findings was that 32 percent of the samples exceeded the national maximum permissible concentration and there was an increasing trend in tea lead concentration from 1989 to 2000. In another, more heartening piece, published the following year in the journal Chemosphere, the researchers indicate that the liming (neutralizing) of acidic tea-garden soils is an effective way to reduce lead contamination in tea leaves.

And, you may ask, what about trace amounts of radiation showing up in Japanese green tea? Much of that country’s tea is produced far to the west of Fuskushima, where the 2011 nuclear power-plant disaster occurred, but still—is there reason to worry? I turned to Elizabeth Andoh, the world’s leading English-language authority on Japanese food (and longtime Gourmetcontributing editor). “The subject of radiation contamination of the food chain (tea included) is VERY complicated,” she wrote. “For me, the bottom line is the reputation of the vendor and the vendor’s diligence in researching and testing.” If choosing an online vendor, look to see if the company includes radiation test results for their teas.

So, should you simply avoid green tea altogether? Well, it’s not a necessary nutrient, so it is your choice to drink it or not. Jeffrey Blumberg, director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory and professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, both at Tufts University, weighed in. “The vast majority of observational studies on large populations of tea drinkers (including those in China) show a dose-related health benefit of tea consumption (i.e., the larger the intake, the greater the benefit), particularly in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease,” he wrote. That’s enough for me.

Tips for buying and brewing green tea

When buying green tea, it’s worth remembering that it is an agricultural crop. Its quality from year to year depends on a number of factors, including climate, weather, soil health, proximity to highway or industrial pollutants, whether it’s harvested by hand or machine, and the care with which it’s been handled, stored, and shipped. “There are thousands of green teas in China,” explained tea merchant Sebastian Beckworth, who travels to remote parts of that and other countries to source fine teas from small farms and collectives. “I don’t blend my teas for consistency,” he added. “I’d rather find farmers who are making a good crop and buy it. And when it’s gone, it’s gone.”

He also introduced the concept of seasonality. “The harvest time is now,” he said. “And green teas don’t keep as long as black teas do. Enjoy a green tea for six months, then try something else.” Any other tips? Forgo prepackaged teabags, which are filled with bits of broken leaves, for the loose leaves; in general, they’re of higher quality, fresher, and you’ll be rewarded with nuances of flavor. And because green tea is so delicate, always brew the leaves in water that hasn’t quite reached a boil (about 180 ºF).

 

 

previous

next

Jane Says: All Carbohydrates Are Not Created Equal

Jane Says: Superbugs Are No Joke

Fermenting Foods—One of the Easiest and Most Creative Aspects of Making Food from Scratch

Story at-a-glance

  • 90 percent of the genetic material in your body is not yours but belongs to the bacteria that outnumber your cells 10 to 1. These bacteria have enormous influence on your digestion, detoxification and immune system

  • Fermented foods are an essential factor if you want to optimize your health and prevent disease. The culturing process produces hundreds if not thousands of times more of the beneficial bacteria found in a typical probiotics, which are extremely important for human health as they help balance your intestinal flora, thereby boosting overall immunity

  • When fermenting vegetables, you can either use a starter culture, or simply allow the natural enzymes in the vegetables do all the work, a.k.a “wild fermentation

  • When fermenting foods, make sure to avoid plastic and/or metal containers. Good options include glass jars, ceramic crocks, and wooden barrels

  • Any food can be fermented, although some are tastier than others. Caution must be heeded when fermenting meats, but any vegetable can certainly be safely fermented, and are among the absolute safest foods there is in terms of food borne illness

Why Dirt Matters to Your Health

Soil Quality

Story at-a-glance

  • The root ball of a plant acts as the “gut” or intestinal tract of the plant, housing essential microbes, just like your gut does, provided the soil system is healthy
  • The cooperation between soil microorganisms and the plants’ roots is responsible for allowing the plant to absorb nutrients from the soil. Without proper soil biome, the food will lack nutrients that are important for your health
  • Soil health connects to everything up the food chain, from plant and insect health, all the way up to animal and human health
  • Health, therefore, truly begins in the soils in which our food is grown
  • Scientists have discovered that gene swapping takes place between your gut microbiome and the soil biome, as well as with microorganisms from other places in your daily surroundings
  • One of the reasons for concern about genetically engineered crops is a main characteristic of such plants is resistance to the potent herbicide glyphosate, which decimates soil bacteria

 

 

Bone Broth—One of Your Most Healing Diet Staples

Story at-a-glance

  • Bone broth contains valuable minerals in a form your body can easily absorb and use, including calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulfur chondroitin, glucosamine, and a variety of trace minerals

  • The gelatin found in bone broth is a hydrophilic colloid. It attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, thereby supporting proper digestion

  • Bone broth also inhibits infection caused by cold and flu viruses, for example, and fights inflammation, courtesy of anti-inflammatory amino acids such as arginine

  • Making your own bone broth is very cost effective, as you can make use of left over carcass bones that would otherwise be thrown away. And making your own broth is quite easy

 

The Dangerous Sleeping Habit That Can Boost Your Odds of Cancer by 35%

If you take sleeping pills you may want to watch this video. Raymond Francis from http://www.beyondhealth.com sheds light on the true dangers of these health threatening drugs. He offers natural alternatives to help kick these addictive, toxic pills

 

Story at-a-glance

  • The first-ever federal health study about sleeping pill usage found that nearly nine million Americans take prescription sleeping pills in pursuit of good night’s rest, and rates are highest among the elderly (age 80 and up)

  • Prescription sleep aids are associated with increased risk of cancer, diabetes, obesity, amnesia, depression, disorientation, and an increased risk of death

  • Sleeping pills are also associated with bizarre and risky nighttime behaviors such as sleepwalking, sleepdriving, sleep eating, “sleep-sex,” and sleep-texting messages you have no memory of sending the next day

  • Insomnia comes with its own risks, including increased risk of infection, depression, cancer, and heart disease; sleeping poorly is also associated with junk food cravings and diminished ability to make good food choices

  • Studies are beginning to show a link between vitamin D level and quality of sleep; optimizing your vitamin D level may improve sleep quality, although more studies are needed to establish the exact mechanism

GROUNDED…Amassing TRUTH.

 

 

  • Walking barefoot on the Earth transfers free electrons from the Earth’s surface into your body that spread throughout your tissues providing beneficial effects. This process is called ‘grounding.’
  • Grounding has been shown to relieve chronic pain, reduce inflammation, improve sleep, thin your blood, enhance well-being and much, much more
  • Wearing plastic- or rubber-soled shoes effectively disconnects you from the Earth’s natural electron flow
  • In the Grounded documentary, you’ll hear first-hand accounts from residents of Haines, Alaska who have overcome chronic pain, sleep apnea and much more simply by getting grounded
  • Like eating right, exercising and sleeping, grounding can be described as yet another lifestyle habit that supports optimal health